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Twitter: Unleashed

Could it be? Did Twitter just announce it’s planning to change the 140 character limit that currently makes its users use think intensely before posting content online?

We’ve gotten word it may be. But how? Isn’t the character limit a key brand asset of Twitter? Isn’t it the only reason Bit.ly, Ow.ly, Tr.im and Goo.gl exist? This revolutionary change could truly redesign the social game. Currently, news and entertainment channels use Tweets to describe social reactions, mostly because they’re concise and can explain what the audience is feeling without cutting them off. I mean, search Twitter on Google, do you know what the description says?

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Yes, exactly.

We currently have limited information about this change so we’re not sure what the finished product will look like, but word on the social hemisphere says it’ll give audiences the space and freedom to share information, posts and links more freely without fearing the character limit. Very kind of Dorsey to open the floodgates of oversharing and run on sentences before his departure.

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There is a lot of pressure on Twitter to constantly evolve and excite audiences, but is taking away a key brand feature the way to do it?

Actually, yes.

Facebook has evolved more times than man since 2004, and it doesn’t show any signs of slowing down (they’ve just launched a video profile picture- go check it out). Twitters major changes have been kept at bay, never drastic enough to cause a stir within the social market. Even this change could have been seen coming as they removed the 140 character limit on direct messages back in June. One could only assume what direction they were flying towards. Twitter has been nothing but positive over the years, aiding in revolutions across the world, being a beacon in war zones, amplifying citizen journalism. So if adding more characters to our limit is what they want to do, whilst still keeping the freedom it’s given us, why not?

After you, Twitter.